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Engine side cover
Topic Started: Sun May 13, 2018 11:58 am (95 Views)
Arnold-USA
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The large steel cover on the side of the block, under the carburetors, had a pin hole leak which was not going to get any better. The seal was not in good shape either. I managed to remove it yesterday without breaking any of the 29 bolts holding it on. My thought is to get it sand blasted and then weld a steel panel to the outside. I figure making it fit as perfectly as possible inside the slight lip facing away from the engine is the best idea. Maybe 12 or 14 ga steel? Has anyone else made a similar repair? I had thought having it hot dip galvanized would be worth considering, that would seal pin holes but then I would worry about the galvanic issue with the coolant. Would the zinc end up getting pulled away from the plate and depositing elsewhere inside the cooling system?

Does anyone know if this seal is available on its own or am I looking at an engine set? I need a valve gasket and a front main seal anyway, and the manifold gaskets...might as well do the head gasket also. This car seems to really enjoy being wrenched on. I think with the coolant drained I might as well remove and bypass the heater cores and their cardboard housings. Lots of clean-up to do under the hood on this one. The engine really needs to come out.
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FreemanGarden
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Arnold - just give Tom Hanson at the Classic Center a call or email.

thomas dot hanson at mbusa dot com

866-622-5277

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Pollyponton
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Probably plenty of old ones about to replace it with . But weld it up with a nice external plate , have the plate engraved, give the engine some history. I did this with my A pilar repairs, name and date.This brings to mind a story.
I was renovating a house ( an old craftsman style house , which we call 'between wars bungalow' here in Australia) and on a previously cover'd wall the builder had written in a beautiful copper plate hand writing 'finished Anzac day ( our veterans day) 1926'. A connection had been made and it felt good. We dont really own these cars we just inherit them for a time like property. Its good to leave a human connection.
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Arnold-USA
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Well, I looked into the part new, Niemoller had one and Tom matched their price. My preference is a known domestic seller so the classic center wins. Why waste 5 hours carving a filler panel when the underlying sheet metal already wants to become a sacrificial anode. I was surprised to see the engine block had zero perceptible corrosion after vacuuming and scraping away the sediment that collected in the low spots of the pan to the block.

However, I pulled out the heater plenum on the right side and after looking closer at the battery tray figured out the bottom was in fact an aluminum NO TRESPASSING sign! Aside from a rats nest under the base of the windshield and a petrified rodent to boot if the only issue of the body is a small area of metal to replace then woo-hoo! I did find a few wires in need of attention, so my plan is to re-wrap the entire harness. Years back I did this on an OpelGT and it turned out well. I did the harness in shrink tubing, this one calls for friction tape. I'll do a bit more research to be sure.

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FreemanGarden
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Arnold- congrats on "seeing the light". Tom Hanson helped me bring my 220S and 190b back to life over the last ten years.

I was amazed that my 1958 220S had no rust or corrosion except in two places: the Hydrak vacuum cannister in the wheel well, and the floor under the battery. First time I pulled the battery to clean up a bit, I discovered the floor was ... a FOR SALE sign.

Maybe your ponton and my ponton had the same previous owner!

I did renew sections of the 190b's wiring harness with friction tape and some shrink tubing. Great minds think alike, eh?

Tom M.
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Arnold-USA
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That is just too funny Tom! It is amazing how some folks fix for convenience, while others fix in the hope it gets passed along to another generation. This is my Patek Phillipe car! By the time I finish all the hard parts all will be left is the paint, the upholstery and the wood. And when all the running gear is up to my reliability standards I'm gonna drive the hell out of it before spending any effort on appearance. Next up is to pull the engine. That way I can restore the front suspension, clean it and do the front main seal. Oh, and the battery tray repairs at the same time. Did you save any in-process pics of the tray repairs? Feel free to PM me.
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FreemanGarden
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Arnold - I'm afraid I don't have any battery tray photos, but here's what I did.

1. tossed the For Sale sign into the bin.
2. wire brushed the entire battery area
3. carefully washed and dried.
4. coated exposed metal with POR15
5. used pop-rivets to fasten a new steel plate over the dodgy floor
6. (I'd coated the steel plate with POR15 first)
7. Placed a thin rubber mat (cut from an old inner tube) on the steel plate
8. Replaced battery and hold-down bracket
9. Drove to California

Tom M.
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Douglas Broome
Douglas Broome
I found hockey tape to be the best for wrapping wiring harness.
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Arnold-USA
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Seems this topic has gotten everyone involved! I'm thinking of borrowing one of the tig welders from work and making some slightly more permanent repairs, although I could still do something temporary. I'm already in California so there's nowhere to go but back to Connecticut to have a beer with Tom Morehouse :)

And of course bring one of my signature cigars.

The new side cover came in today. Surprising, the inside edge was covered by a black tar-like coating and the outside had a yellow zinc coating. I have to imagine the originality of the finished effort will be to have a nice zinc exterior. It sure does help to remove some of the doom & gloom of a grimy black & dirty engine compartment. Something about a clean engine room is so appealing.

When I put the manifolds back on I'm thinking about replacing the springs on the heat risers on the exhausts and doing a touch-up bead blast on the intakes. What is the preferred method of blasting aluminum like the manifolds and the valve cover? I done want to remove metal, CO2 seems to be the best. A nice black ceramic coating on the exhaust manifolds?
Edited by Arnold-USA, Thu May 17, 2018 9:37 pm.
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Henry Magno

Even though the new side covers come with zinc plating on the outside, originally they were painted black, probably after the engine was assembled.
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