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1/48 Sopwith F.1 Camel; Kit No. 03906
Topic Started: Apr 16 2018, 07:51 PM (113 Views)
jacksdad64
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Tornado geek
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The Sopwith Camel was a British First World War single-seat biplane fighter aircraft introduced on the Western Front in 1917. It was developed by the Sopwith Aviation Company as a successor to the earlier Sopwith Pup and became one of the most iconic fighter aircraft of the First World War.
The Camel was powered by a single rotary engine and was armed with twin synchronized machine guns. Though proving difficult to handle, it provided for a high level of manoeuvrability to an experienced pilot, an attribute which was highly valued in the type's principal use as a fighter aircraft. In total, Camel pilots have been credited with the shooting down of 1,294 enemy aircraft, more than any other Allied fighter of the conflict. Towards the end of the Great War, the type had also seen use as a ground-attack aircraft, partially due to it having become increasingly outclassed as the capabilities of fighter aircraft on both sides were rapidly advancing at that time.
The main variant of the Camel was designated as the F.1; several dedicated variants were built for a variety of roles, including the 2F.1 Ship's Camel, which was used for operating from the flight decks of aircraft carriers, the Comic night fighter variant, and the T.F.1, a dedicated 'trench fighter' that had been armoured for the purpose of conducting ground attacks upon heavily defended enemy lines. The Camel also saw use as a two-seat trainer aircraft. In January 1920, the last aircraft of the type were withdrawn from RAF service.


The kit


This is a re-box of the Eduard Camel which dates from 2003 and if you have seen any of the Eduard 1/48 (or even 1/72) WWI aircraft kits you'll know how good the quality of mouldings and details are. the four blue/grey sprues are bagged together with the transparent sprue in its own bag. The sprues are tightly enough packed that there is no movement of them which can sometimes result in scuffs and scratches.

Instructions are the now familiar colour glossy magazine style with 26 colourised construction steps and four painting and marking steps. Markings are supplied for :-

No.139 Squadron, Villaverla, Italy July 1918
No.73 Squadron, Ruisseaville, france July 1918

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Conclusion

These kits really are absolute gems, even out of the box, but with added rigging and some other added details these can look stunning. I have seen some of these built at shows and they really lovely little kits and well worth trying if you haven't already and its great to see Revell re-boxing these and I hope in doing so these kits gain more fans.



Highly recommended


Many thanks to Revell for the review sample.


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Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers.
For details visit ;

Revell Website

Revell Facebook



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Olde Farte
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Lt. Derek 'Smurfy' Reeve
A nice review, too old for me though. The aircraft not the kit I should add.
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