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Trunk Trip. Or should I say hatch?
Topic Started: Mar 25 2013, 09:44 PM (586 Views)
Jason Goldring
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While not the smartest idea to camp alone, I am sure that many would want the security of sleeping with some sort of protective barrier around them, to ensure night time visitors don't ruin things. The SUV that we have will fit a nice twin air mattress just fine, when the seats are down. Comfy, it works, but the problem is what to do with the equipment when you have the mattress setup? Most can stay outside, but food becomes a problem. Do you keep your cooler and food inside your vehicle with you? Chances are, a hungry bear will tear apart everything to get to it. Leave it outside? Raccoon, foxes, bears. All the opportunistic feeders might poke their head into your camp.

In the past I have left the cooler outside. Bungee cords across the top, very tight. It will be a very sore raccoon if one of those snapped, but I have not come across that yet.

What do you folks do for food storage? How do you manage it?

Jason
"As long as I stand between the sun and my shadow, I guess I am doing well...." -Stuart Adamson
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Jamie
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Wise Owl
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You know an animal would make a mess of a paint job even if they can't get in to the vehicle I'm inclined to hang it between trees away from the sleeping area any way just to keep them away. I was reading about a camper who forgot he had a chocolate bar in his jacket pocket in a tent with him . He had a hell of a time kicking and beating off a racoon with his flashlight.
"An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth. We'll all end up blind and hungry".

Me
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todd0329
Timber Wolf
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Depends on the situation. If I'm hiking deep into an area and staying for more than a couple of days, I store my food in one of those water proof/air-tight kayak bags and hang it carefully from a branch well out of reach of most critters. In the past, I've also thrown in the bag some essential oils of local trees which helps to mask the scent of the food. But, the food is also triple or quadruple bagged to further hide the scent. Worked like a charm in the mountains of Bella Coola years back with both grizzlies and black bears around. The one time I didn't bother to add the essential oils (in Northern Ontario), some squirrels ripped apart my kayak bag to get at the food which was mostly nuts and seeds (so I guess I can't blame them) and I didn't do a great job of keeping it out of their reach either. Live and learn.

If I'm doing a drive-up camp situation, I simply just leave a cooler (tightly closed) in my trunk and get food as I need it. Knock on wood, but I've never had an issue with animals trying to get into my car. Then again, I don't usually pack anything highly aromatic. I also never sleep in my vehicle always in a tent.

Something people fail to realize is to never sleep in the same clothes you cook in. Your clothes absorb the smells of your meals. In BC, I always stored my cooking clothes with my food, and NEVER wore them other then to wear them while I was cooking. I never cook meat or aromatic foods when I'm researching, and primarily I don't have a fire going either. If I cook, it's something simple like plain rice or noodles on a little gas stove. In my experience, a fire only makes you cold when you finally retire to your tent (especially in Fall/Winter or early Spring). Secondly, a fire messes up your night vision. I don't think a fire is needed to 'draw' Sasquatch in...they know when and where you're around. I believe that cooking and a fire merely attract unwanted guests. But, a lot of people prefer to have a fire because it gives them a sense of security.

TODD PRESCOTT
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Jason Goldring
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Todd - Great info! The food smell on clothing, yes, I bet you that is one of the most overlooked things to consider.

It may be possible that the smell of burning wood - campfires - invokes some sort of involuntary habitual response from animals to indicate that they should move out of the area. Much like we have learned, we know the smell of burning material can often indicate bad things. Forest fires kill thousands of animals but not without a struggle. They know, from the heat, smoke, intensity, to move out of the area. So to think one might have a bit of luck seeing any wildlife while having a fire, albeit it has happened, lowers the odds drastically. At least, that is my impression.

Jason

"As long as I stand between the sun and my shadow, I guess I am doing well...." -Stuart Adamson
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I find when out in the bush..barrel packs are good and I will always hang it up in trees..Its done good for me so far.
I hope that's a help.
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SquatchDawg
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Usually I hang food from a rope about 10- 15 ft off the ground from a tree branch. Important to remember to also keep it a fair distance from your tent/ sleeping area so that any critters trying to get into it will not keep you up all night.
Once, on a canoe trip, I made the mistake of setting up camp in an oak grove. I hung my pack as usual and retired for the night. Within minutes, a family of raccoons ( I suppose came to feed on the acorns) quickly discovered my pack and tried desperately to get into it all night. they chittered, squabbled and fell repeatedly from the rope holding my pack. In the process they were knocking loose acorns from the trees, which fell constantly on my tent like rain all night long. Needless to say I didn't get any sleep that night, but in the end I was victorious. Didn't lose a morsel.
If we knew what we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?
Albert Einstein
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