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At Last an Ontario Cougar
Topic Started: Mar 27 2017, 09:43 AM (198 Views)
Peter Smith
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Pathfinder
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At last a body. Well, at least cougar existence cannot be denied in Ontario by MNR any longer.
http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/thunder...stery-1.4041876
“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't, no proof is possible.”
― Stuart Chase
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davidwa
Swift Cougar
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My former neighbors in Hamilton who were avid Moose hunters had told me they had been seeing cougars regularly since 2005 where they go hunting. They even claimed to have been stalked on a couple of occasions.

No denying a carcass. Too bad it did not survive.
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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I've got a number of good reports from the GTA as well (North and West).
As the population grows, more animal-human encounters are inevitable.
No denying that Ontario is a very wild place.
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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Another cougar sighting was reported around Orangeville. MNRF still doubt the fact that they are here and this far south.

If there are any OWFR members in the area, please keep your eyes open. We'd like to capture a photo or video of the animal before MNR and police are dispatched.
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rubberboots
Swift Cougar
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A friend's sister had seen a cougar about 2 years ago, just north-west of Sudbury (she used to work for the MNR, I would trust her identification of the animal completely). I haven't heard of any other reports in the area though. On a similar note, I've personally noticed more lynx in northern Ontario while out camping and hunting in the past few years, I'm thinking whatever factors are contributing to a greater lynx population (or at least them being seen more often) may also account for the upswing in cougar sighting reports in recent years.
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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Lynx go through a population spike every few years or so. This could explain why you have noticed them. Their life is specially intertwined with the snowshoe hare, which is their #1 food source. When it's a good year for snowshoe hare, the lynx have larger litters (sometimes 4-6 kittens). In 'off' years they may only have 1 kitten. In larger litter years, instinctively they know that this will be a good year for food. I'm no expert, but that is the gist of it. I would love to see a lynx in the wild.
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Peter Smith
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It is amazing how nature is so much better at forecasting climate conditions, than humans are. As Tim says, they have litter sizes complimentary to the available food resources.

Plant life is also much better than humans. For example, why are onion skins thicker, BEFORE we get a very cold winter? Who gives the bees a head's-up, if we are going to get deeper snow? They put their hives above the snowline.

So many observations of flora and fauna knowing so much more than us.

A few years ago, a native friend told me that we would be getting a long winter. I said, "Oh, you have been watching the nature signs?"

"No", he said, "Our ancestors did that. Nowadays we just watch how much firewood the white men are cutting."
“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't, no proof is possible.”
― Stuart Chase
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Tim M
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haha, that gave me a chuckle.

It is amazing how much more awareness animals and plants have. To us, it's would seem clairvoyant. There is no way the Lynx can know how many snowshoe hares are out there... can it? There is a strong connection in nature. Maybe directly linked to predator/prey breeding. It's so intense that I heard that some lynx will not mate at all if they know it will be an 'off' year. In the animal kingdom that is unheard of.

The Lynx is not just a one off either, I recently learned that the owl does the same. If it is a bad year for lemmings it will produce less chicks.
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NaturalPath
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Timber Wolf
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This is a good and, very important point. Natural processes have developed over millions of years and, are all very intricately connected to each other. Human interference in those natural processes has caused untold damage to the animals and, their environment and, continues to do so. Humans do not have the intelligence required to meddle about in these processes that have taken millions of years to evolve. The possible domino effect of one, seemingly, small change, can have catastrophic effects years later. Even trying to 'fix' some of the mistakes we have made is a big mistake in itself. We don't have the intelligence to do so. The best we can do now is to just stay out of natures way, as much as possible, and let those natural processes do what we can't do. Feeding wildlife is a big issue, for example. Nature has it's way of balancing the food available, with the number of animals in that particular environment. For humans to come in and, decide to artificially feed these wild animals is, in a way, overruling the natural processes that keep different species under control, so that they don't overwhelm the resources required for a healthy population.
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rubberboots
Swift Cougar
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A bit more on the topic:
https://www.oodmag.com/news/whats-deal-onta...tform=hootsuite
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