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Beer in the backcountry; No cans, no glass, no hope?
Topic Started: May 17 2017, 11:04 AM (366 Views)
Tim M
Wise Owl
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As some of you may know, most Provincial Parks have banned cans and glass in their backcountry areas. This includes one time use, non-burnable containers. It could be a Pepsi or a beer, what matters is the container (bug spray, fuel and medicine are allowed).

I realize this is a very first world problem, but those who camp and hike will understand that there is nothing better than a beer on the lake after a long journey. It's the simple things in life that we must treasure.

Has anyone figured out a solution to bringing beer into the backcountry? I'm not asking about wine or liquor, I'm asking specifically about beer.

I used to see those plastic bottles of MGD at the LCBO, but I don't see them anymore.

Has anyone put beer in water bottles or a collapsible platypus container?

Would love to hear your ideas.
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NaturalPath
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Timber Wolf
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Hey Tim;

I always bring cans of beer along, they are made out of very light aluminum, and they will completely burn in the fire, no problem. Bringing beer bottles camping is a definite no no, and I would discourage anyone from doing that. I see way too many broken beer bottles in beautiful wilderness locations, it makes me sick. I do see beer cans too, just because people are too lazy to burn them. They can create all the rules they want, but they can't create responsible campers, only proper parenting, from a young age, can do that.
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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Yes I've heard those cans can be burned up, but the problem is if the rangers catch you with them in hand, bag or tent before you've had a chance to enjoy them then you're facing a hefty fine. It could really ruin your weekend.

My goal is to eliminate that risk altogether so my trips are bogged down with worries.

I can't believe plastic beer bottles aren't a popular option.

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Popejay
Swift Cougar
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A friend of mine brews his own and bottles them in plastic. My wife routinely goes to Japan and recently came back with a device that fits the top of a screw cap plastic bottle, with a bubble on top which is used to re-pressurize the bottle after opening to increase its longevity vis a vis preserving the carbonation.

Regards Popejay
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NaturalPath
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Timber Wolf
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I don't really get the plastic bottle thing, for one, drinking beer from a plastic bottle just doesn't appteal to me at all. Also, how is bringing plastic bottles into the backcountry any different? The same people that throw cans and bottles around would throw plastic bottles around too, how is that different? As I said, rules like that don't change anything. It's people's attitudes that need changing, and that can only be done in the parenting process.
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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It's because plastic can easily be burned where as cans and bottles aren't so easy, plus they take longer to decompose naturally.

Beverage can is said to take about 350 YEARS

Food cans are said to take 200-500 YEARS

Sure some thin cans will burn, but most need high heat.

I don't mind drinking out of plastic, i just don't want it exploding in my bag. I guess if I keep the jostling to a minimum it should be fine.

Popejay, do you know what that bubble apparatus is called? Maybe it can be found online.
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NaturalPath
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Timber Wolf
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Yep, I understand what you're saying Tim, my point was that, if they allow plastic bottles, they will still get people throwing those all over the place too, just look at the water bottle situation. The rule doesn't make sense.

I think that Popejay was referring to something like this;
https://tinyurl.com/kwctwgz
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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Oh yeah I totally agree the rules don't make sense.
It's completely absurd.

One of the most common thing left behind at campsites are folding camp chairs. How long do those take to break down? Yet they are still not banned.
You can bring in pretty much anything, but not a can, which could have many uses.

Thanks for the link!

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Popejay
Swift Cougar
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Hello Tim and Natural Path, yes the link to the item Natural Path provided is the product I was referring to. My wife says she gets them for about $5 CAN in Japan.

I for one, ignore the dumb commands of this dead society and pay the consequence with their fiat currency if unfortunate enough to get caught.

This is just another sign of the end of days.

Tim, would you like one to try? My wife goes to Japan again next week and goes 3 times a month.

Regards Popejay
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NaturalPath
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Timber Wolf
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Quote:
 
I for one, ignore the dumb commands of this dead society and pay the consequence with their fiat currency if unfortunate enough to get caught.
" :lol:

I like your attitude Popejay, I think that we would get along quite well. ;)
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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I did a little experiment. I took two beers into the backcountry recently and poured them into plastic water bottles to test how this would work.

I figured the rangers would be out in full force on the long weekend and not give any warnings for finding cans.

The plastic held the beer just fine with room to spare. The lake was able to keep it cold, but the beer was a little flat when I got to my campsite. Still tasted fine, but it did lack that refreshing carbonation that we all love.

The major draw back was I had to baby these two bottles for the whole way to make sure they didn't get too shaken up or leak.

Was it worth it? Yes, yes it was.

Would I do it again? Probably not, I'd much rather take the can. But of course on the one day I do I will be mugged by rangers.

I guess I can spray them with bear mace?

Thanks for your offer Popejay, that is very kind, but I think the plastic bottles are a bit more of a hassle than I want. So I will pass at this time. I will probably just risk the fine even though that would be a big blow to the bank account. At least I will have a fresh beer to cheer me up. ;)
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NaturalPath
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Timber Wolf
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I have to agree with you here Tim. In my mind, plastic bottles are much more of a problem in the outdoors than cans are. I've taken cans of beer into the backcountry for years, and I've always burned them completely, to ashes. It doesn't take long. As far as food cans go, they take a little longer but, as long as you burn the plastic coating off food cans, they will rust away eventually. Plastic will degrade with the sun eventually but, unless they are in a sunny location, they will last for many years. I would say that plastic water bottles are the most frequently encountered garbage that I see, when I'm exploring the wilderness. Glass beer bottles come in at a close second, whether broken, or still whole. Sometimes regulations, or laws, don't make sense and, as usual, they were create for only a certain segment of the population who don't seem to care about leaving a mess. Nevertheless, all of us are affected by these regulations, or laws. Sometimes we just have to use our own judgment on these kinds of things and, like you say, accept the consequences, if they should come our way. Of course, there's always the standard "Oh my goodness, I didn't know about that Mr. Ranger." Sometimes, if you're real polite, that will work. What's the old saying, better to ask forgiveness after, than to ask permission, before.
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Peter Smith
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Pathfinder
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I am a responsible person. I am also a rebel when it comes to rules that are made for irresponsible people. Normal people, do not need rules. Common sense, empathy, and respect for our environment, and others, are our compass. So when I am out in the wilds, be it common land, or park, I follow my own rules. I take cans of beer. I crush the empty cans and bring them home. In fact, whatever goes with me, comes home with me.

“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't, no proof is possible.”
― Stuart Chase
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Tim M
Wise Owl
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I will try burning the cans down completely next time.

It's true that these rules don't make sense. Another example is that I like to remove waste from wilderness areas that was at one point left behind by those irresponsible ones. Now, that is no longer an option. If I see a can in the backcountry I will no longer pick it up, because if I am caught with someone elses garbage they would still stick me with $125 fine. Not at all fair for doing a good deed.

It's working against the park.
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Peter Smith
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Pathfinder
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That's a good point Tim. Those of us that pick up litter from others, are now discouraged to do so.

Several years ago, a $5 charge was put on all old tires, {"to help with disposal costs"}. We warned them, No, there will be tires dumped in the bush. So now we have tires dumped in the bush. Remove the dump fees, and most people will use the dumps. I say most, as there are still the lazy ones. I would hike litter fines to $500.
“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't, no proof is possible.”
― Stuart Chase
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