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Film of the Week: Uski Roti (1970)

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Topic Started: May 7 2011, 10:09 AM (12,478 Views)
jgwr
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brokenface
Jan 23 2012, 08:47 PM
La graine et le mulet/Couscous/The Secret of the Grain. 7/10

I put off watching this one for a long time, didn't think it would be for me. And the first half-hour or so seemed to confirm my suspicions, but it drew me in once the central plot got going
You mean there's actually a point where the plot gets going? Must've been after I walked out...
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niesl2
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3 Idiots.

One of the first Hindi/Bollywood style films I have seen (after Slumdog Millionaire) and I really didn't know what to expect. It was kinda long and the dancing and singing wasn't really my cup of tea, but it had some laughs, some drama and an interesting story. 7/10.

Lupin III: Castle of Cagliostro.

A Miyazaki oldie from the pre-Ghibli era, but you can defenitely see where the high standard of his Ghibli movies is coming from. Not his best of course, but fun to watch. 7/10.
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JCS
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Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002)
8/10

Interesting film, looking at the supposed genocide of the Aborigines in Australia. Worth the watch.
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sushantv10
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This has been a good month so far , saw close to 10 by Yasujiro Ozu .
Last saw yesterday his early silent comedy I was born but...(1932).
Another delightful one.
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niesl2
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Woman in the Dunes.

I don't like Kafka because the lack of character building. While watching this film I learned that I also don't like Kafka-like stories with characterbuilding. I get while people find it intriguing or good, but I was glad when the end titles started rolling.
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brokenface
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Repo Man (Alex Cox, 1984) 9/10

Goddamn, where has this film been all my life. Loved it. Hit the spot in so many ways. Can't believe it's taken me so long to see it.
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Kasparius
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brokenface
Mar 1 2012, 10:36 PM
Repo Man (Alex Cox, 1984) 9/10

Goddamn, where has this film been all my life. Loved it. Hit the spot in so many ways. Can't believe it's taken me so long to see it.
I need to see this, I've always had a feeling that I would love it. I'm a big fan of the three other Alex Cox movies I've seen, Sid and Nancy, Walker and Highway Patrolman.
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burneyfan
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brokenface
Mar 1 2012, 10:36 PM
Repo Man (Alex Cox, 1984) 9/10

Goddamn, where has this film been all my life. Loved it. Hit the spot in so many ways. Can't believe it's taken me so long to see it.
On my unranked 550 -- it is so bad in such a great way. Some priceless moments. One of the only R-rated Beta tapes my dad owned (given to him by a friend).

I've heard it's pretty bad-in-a-WTF-way, but ever since VincentPrice did Straight to Hell for the Guess the Allusion game months ago, I've been wanting to see that, too. I don't care if it sucks or not.
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brokenface
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Kasparius
 
brokenface
Mar 1 2012, 10:36 PM
Repo Man (Alex Cox, 1984) 9/10

Goddamn, where has this film been all my life. Loved it. Hit the spot in so many ways. Can't believe it's taken me so long to see it.
I need to see this, I've always had a feeling that I would love it. I'm a big fan of the three other Alex Cox movies I've seen, Sid and Nancy, Walker and Highway Patrolman.

Go for it. I'm already keen to see more Alex Cox films. Will look out for the ones you mention.
Edited by brokenface, Mar 1 2012, 11:06 PM.
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afirm
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High Plains Drifter (1973) Clint Eastwood - 8/10
A good Western.
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JCS
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The Third Man (1949)
9/10

First noir and it was very good, can't fault it really. Need to watch some more noirs now.
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TheRedDeath
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Andrei Rublev. 18/20

P.S.: This movie has probably the dumbest comment section on iCM. :facepalm:
Edited by TheRedDeath, Mar 6 2012, 12:54 AM.
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St. Gloede
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Die Parallelstrasse / The Parallel Street (1962, Ferdinand Khittl)
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The number 188 appears, then the screen goes completely black. We hear noises and words spoken in many tongues. Then as suddenly as it all began we find ourselves in a poorly lit room, photographed in black and white, where a clerk stationed at his desk tells five men, seemingly researching documents that this is the end of the first session. Soon, after the credits are done rolling, we're told that this is the end of "Part 2".

The clerk is our only direct link into an logical comprehension of what is appearing before our eyes. In the early minutes of the film he confesses to us his sorrow over how the five men cannot comprehend the documents are mirrors of their own existence. He comments on their futile efforts to make sense of what's before them. How they have made a meaningless chart and made rules that comes to nothing. He notes that they will fail, like all before them, and that at the end of the last 90 minute session their lives will end.

And after this introduction "part 3" may commence as the five men goes through document 189, 190, and so on in the hope of reaching the last document 310 before their time is up. The documents themselves are segments filmed in color covering parts of the world, the human mindset, human constructions, etc. usually with an attached set of information the clerk reads out. We are now to follow the men try to make sense of what's put before them and the discussions they have between them. Their tone is calm, and relatively collected.

Whether or not the exercise is an allegory of life and the human existence can be debated, I felt this was the most comprehensible solution, but this is about so much more than simple answers. I cannot underline many enough times what a unique experience this is. It harbors an obscure sense of poetic beauty, that much like the documents explored are slightly out of our comprehension. Be it an astute beauty of life, a melancholy feeling of being lost or simply the joy of watching and partaking in such an astonishing artistic creation/experience, this movie manages to cover so much emotion, and perhaps even information, without ever really revealing its core or giving us something we can easily grasp and categorize.

The fact that it consciously incorporates into our minds that this is the last part of a larger picture was also something I could not easily shake, and it stayed on my mind throughout. First I thought it was a negative, a form of unnecessary confusion, but now, in retrospect, I view it differently. It not only creates a craving for more, but it creates a sense of claustrophobia, and in a lesser sense bewilderment. With the exception of one re-evaluated document you see none of the 187 first documents, and the exercise itself is a mystery, we know nothing about the surrounding situation and reasoning behind what we see. I found this to create an incredibly strong experience for me. The Parallel Street is a film I will never forget.

9/10
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sebby
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Kasparius
Mar 1 2012, 10:50 PM
brokenface
Mar 1 2012, 10:36 PM
Repo Man (Alex Cox, 1984) 9/10

Goddamn, where has this film been all my life. Loved it. Hit the spot in so many ways. Can't believe it's taken me so long to see it.
I need to see this, I've always had a feeling that I would love it. I'm a big fan of the three other Alex Cox movies I've seen, Sid and Nancy, Walker and Highway Patrolman.
Repo Man is absolutely hilarious. See it. You, especially, will appreciate this scene:

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St. Gloede
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I fidanzati / The Fiances is a beautifully shot, contemplative and understated film about love and life. One of the first things that struck me was how it with such ease played around with past and present, through brrief flasbacks playing on emotion more than anything else. It's a very interesting narrative as we slowly follow our lead character leave his home town and fiance for the oppurtunity of getting better position. This really didn't feel like an Italian film for me as it's such a close relative of the French New Wave. It's elegant use of flashbacks it's not it's only experimentation with form, it also features a lot of very interesting editing. The editing of the flashbacks is quite impressive, but the way it creates atmosphere by switching between slower more atmospheric scenes suddenly being abrupted by him closing the door as his guest leave or finding himself in a different place entirely. It was all highly impressive. It's also soft, quite gentle and towards the end it essentially explodes in love as the two lovers reads their letters to flashes of their past relationship and current situation. But despite all this it felt rather stilted, and with the exception of a few scenes very little grabbed me emotionally. So I essentially spent my time marvelling at the technical aspects and the creativity, yet never really getting in to the films emotional core. This is however a film I can see many people falling head-over-heels in love with, so I wanted to take my time and give it a proper write up. It should be pointed out that this was Ermanno Olmi first feaure movie after his most known endeavor(save The Tree of Wooden Clogs), Il Posto, which I liked a great bit more, but if you were a fan of that this is most likely a film for you.
Edited by St. Gloede, Mar 12 2012, 02:32 AM.
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sebby
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Watched Melancholia yesterday. Not sure why I did that. I dislike LVT so damn much.
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allisoncm
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I Love You Alice B. Toklas. Thought this was a check. Or at least I thought it had something to do with Gertrude Stein, beside the song. It was totally groovy though man. Makes me want to paint my car. 6.5/10
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St. Gloede
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Tôkyô no kôrasu / Tokyo Chorus (1931, Yasujirô Ozu)
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An odd not too essential piece of Ozu's fimography. We open up at the high school/college schoolyard where we just follow the gym class, the print I had was accompanied by one of the most cliched "comedic" silent scores you'd never expect to see in a Japanese movie, can't really find any info on wether or not it was eddited like this on it's initial release. First I wondered if it might have been the American release, but as the intertitles were in Japanese I doubt it. Anyways it was basically just the usual rythm which was implying what went on was funny, while it wasn't particularly so, hence the need for quirky music.

We jump several years forward in time and find one of the students as a father working ia an insurance company. We get a few more thought out jokes, justifying the score, but then the man stands up to his boss, and as we pretty much knew when he went into the office he gets fired. The music gets more toned down, and for the last half of the film it completely disappears, as does the comedy. We now focus on the family and the man's search for a new job. It's charming enough, and pretty lighthearted. He soon runs into his old teacher, explaining the need for the prolouge described above. Yeah, I'm giving out a lot of plot-points, but this really isn't that sort of film you can spoil. It's a well made drama comedy that manages to make you care about the characters well enough, but isn't really giving us anything special, and I'll forget about it soon.

It should also be pointed out that this film was made before Ozu really grew into his style. The visuals/aesthetics are often pretty bland, particularly during the opening sequence. It's a cute little story. Good enough, nothing more. 6/10.
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Rich
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A Safe Place...why is this on Criterion? The only thing I liked was Orson Welles as a magician.
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wuzzawuzz
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Watched White Hunter Black Heart earlier as part of my Clint Eastwood goal. I really enjoyed it. Eastwood has done a few films that are largely forgotten but are surprisingly good. Honky Tonk Man is another really good one, but I reckon Breezy, The Gauntlet, Bronco Billy, Pale Rider, Heartbreak Ridge and Bird are all also pretty good. Add those to his other more well known early films like Play Misty For Me, High Plains Drifter and The Outlaw Josey Wales and it's ain't too shabby a filmography. This is all before Unforgiven and his more recent hits too.

I chose Eastwood almost randomly for this goal but so far I'm really glad I did.
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AdamH
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wuzzawuzz
Mar 21 2012, 12:53 AM
Watched White Hunter Black Heart earlier as part of my Clint Eastwood goal. I really enjoyed it. Eastwood has done a few films that are largely forgotten but are surprisingly good. Honky Tonk Man is another really good one, but I reckon Breezy, The Gauntlet, Bronco Billy, Pale Rider, Heartbreak Ridge and Bird are all also pretty good. Add those to his other more well known early films like Play Misty For Me, High Plains Drifter and The Outlaw Josey Wales and it's ain't too shabby a filmography. This is all before Unforgiven and his more recent hits too.

I chose Eastwood almost randomly for this goal but so far I'm really glad I did.
Honkytonk Man is one of my favourite Eastwood films. Pity it doesn't get more attention.

White Hunter and Bird of two of the handful of films I've still got to see.
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St. Gloede
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The Hunger Games (2012, Gary Ross)
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Just watched my first 2012 film. It was the pre-release of The Hunger Games. Being surrounded my tween girls in costumes was probably one of the most awkward experiences of my life, and please don't ask me why I was there. At the beginning of the movie it almost seemed like a bad joke.

The costumes was so ridiculously caricated, obviously for comedic effect, but without any form of dedication. Was as if it was taken out of a Tim Burton/John Waters movie. Stanley Tucci's blue hair will forever be burnt into my mind, it was absolutely ridiculous. And he was actually one of the few who seemed in on the joke, the rest really wasn't pulled off too well.

So yeah, at the beginning it was quite awful. Pathetic acting all around, including Jennifer Lawrence, who has showed she can do a lot better. Heck, the set-up kinda reminded me of Winters Bone, making it all the more in your face what a gigantic step-down this is. But what can you expect from what's essentially Battle Royale for teenage girls.

As the action start I did get a bit more into it and it was just mediocre rather than horrid. Pathetically safe mind you, no moral ambigiousity, which I can't even fathom they managed to avoid given the consept itself. Well, I guess they deserve some credit for making a film about teens killing each other "safe".

So yeah, nothing particularly big, with the exclusion of the 142 min run time. It did seem to have a great effect on the fans though. Several people started crying when a person was killed and they were cheering and clapping throughout. Was a bit like being in the Twilight Zone. :D

And honestly Woody Harrelson must have been on drugs, in fact everyone involved must have been on drugs.
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Rich
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Let me guess...she wins?
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Knaldskalle
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Home Alone 4
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I really liked Battle Royale, but I just can't seem to muster any enthusiasm for Hunger Games at all. And I liked Jennifer Lawrence in Winter's Bone so it's not because of her.
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St. Gloede
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Knaldskalle
Mar 23 2012, 01:29 AM
I really liked Battle Royale, but I just can't seem to muster any enthusiasm for Hunger Games at all. And I liked Jennifer Lawrence in Winter's Bone so it's not because of her.
I love Battle Royale too, now try to imagine how BR would be if directed by the guy who did Big and marketed for teenage girls ...
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JCS
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Will probably see Hunger Games, partly because it has been getting rave reviews and I like blockbusters.
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jgwr
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Just spent tonight watching the "Flesh" trilogy by Michael & Roberta Findlay. I am still slightly stunned. Its reputation for being fucked up is deserved. Necessary viewing for trash connoisseurs.
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St. Gloede
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Martha Marcy May Marlene (2011, Sean Durkin)
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A truly disturbing tale of a young women breaking with her cult and struggling with her memories/retrurn to her family. It's elegantly told through flashbacks and dreams. Elizabeth Olsen proves to be a very talented actress, and John Hawkes is great as always, though surprisingly not as used as expected, and surprisingly a lot of the terror I felt throughout the film did not come from him. Some of the material might have been slight tad too simple, but it did manage to go quite far into her psychology. It's also rather ambigious, and the ending/the entire film is going to stay on my mind for a long time. Definitely one of last years best, and it earns an entry into my top 500. 9/10.
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brokenface
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re Martha Marcy

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jgwr
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The Coens' "True Grit". Meh.
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St. Gloede
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brokenface
Mar 26 2012, 10:30 AM
re Martha Marcy

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I can definitely see where you are coming from. Though I didn't think it was a cop-out I did think that it could have been handled differently, however:
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St. Gloede
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I had never even heard of Hiroshi Shimizu before a few days ago, but somehow I stumbled upon these quotes:

Yasujiro Ozu: "I can't shoot films like Shimizu."
Kenji Mizoguchi: "People like me and Ozu get films made by hard work, but Shimizu is a genius..."

I immidiately got the four film released bt Criterion's Eclipse collection and had myself a:


Hiroshi Shimizu mini-marathon

Minato no nihon musume / Japanese Girls at the Harbor (1933, Hiroshi Shimizu)
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A rather couragous film, but in regard of it's controversial thematics, and in it's approach to filmmaking. It contains a certain joy of cinema, which is sadly running a bit wild. There's just too much editing going on. Most of the jumps, which are pretty rapid, appear clunky, and there's just way too many shots were someone fades away, to imply a time jump. This also causes it to feel rather rushed. A rather unique viewing for sure, and it had a lot of interesting material. The story itself is rather simple, which partly works to it's advantage, it has some of the understated emotional level that gives it a lot of power. This seems to be a common denominator for Shimitsu films. But the story could also be a tad contrived, and the simplicity also subtracted a bit in this particular case, just felt a tad thin in the end. Definitely a good film though. 6/10.


Arigatô-san / Mr. Thank You (1936, Hiroshi Shimizu)
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The first thing I noticed was that it still suffered from some of the clunky editing that haunted Japanese Girls at the Harbor, but soon that didn't matter at all. This film manages to capture a certain melancholy joy, an odd creature of calm, understated, socially criticising comedy. It's certainly nowhere near a laugh riot, far from it, but it made me smile from ear to ear on more than one occasion, and this despite the rather tragic undercurrents.

Our title character is a charming bus driver who always thanks the people who let him pass, but this story isn't about him in particular. Almost the entire film is set within the bus, where we spend time with the passengers as they approach their destination. Peope get off and people get on, they indulge in conversation and try to hide their own fates. Our main focus is on a mother taking her 17 year old daughter to Tokyo so she can find work, and it's being alluded to that she will be sold into prostitution, but the other passengers also have their stories. Conversations are exchanged, moral dogmas are explored. This truly is a beautiful creature, and though some of the technical aspects could be better Shimizu has a far better grip on it this time around. 8/10.


Anma to onna / The Masseurs and a Woman (1938, Hiroshi Shimizu)
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Charming and humane tale of a spa, with a particular focus the blind masseurs and the guests, particularly a young woman from Tokyo who may or may not be a thief. The maseurs have more than enough personality, and carry the film wonderfully. You really get to care for these people. The style is calm and observing and depicts an existence of both personal wonders, however small they might seem, and the hardships of life. It's simplicity and dwelling beauty makes it all the more memorable, and the character interactions, does, for the most part anyways, as if taken out of real life. 7/10.


Kanzashi / Ornamental hairpin (1941, Hiroshi Shimizu)
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An intriguing film that rather gets lost somewhere in the making. Shimizu returns to the spa/inn setting, but this time the anmas are merely extras, and we are to follow a rather large group of connected guests as well. A character only referred to as the professor drives most of the early plot. He’s a grumpy old sourpuss who everybody seems to agree with, mostly out of fright it would appear, and quite a lot of humor stems from this, but when one of his acquaintances steps on a hairpin the storyline is soon to change.

So, a bit before the midway point the owner of the hairpin, which seems to have temporarily crippled man, returns to apologize. By this point the comedy is gone, and we are to follow this would be semi-romance. By this point it all just felt really thin, and I didn’t really see a point to it all. It gets some bonus points for a rather unexpected ending, but this is a movie which never really knew what it wanted to be. It’s still more or less good, though most of the best bits are in the first half. 6/10.


Also, the japanese cover artists really deserve some credit, beautiful work:
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jakncoke
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watching Inglorious Bastards atm but the last movie I finished was Sleeper

Was interesting little quirky sci-fi'ish movie from Woody Allen early days. I haven't watched a lot of Woody Allen but it this one for me is right behind Annie Hall/Manhattan. I was thinking to myself man this is kinda different from what I have seen from Woody Allen then I thought to myself, but no. The Woody Allen/Diane Keaton romance angle was very similar to other works of his. But hey I really enjoyed its oddness. For the record, the Woody Allen films I have seen are. Annie Hall, Manhattan, Crimes and Misdemeanors, Midnight in Paris. Yeah I know I got some work to do :P
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karmacarroll
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Dalkomhan insaeng/A Bittersweet Life (2005) - 6/10

Some good scenes and I liked the cinematography, though I felt the film was muddled and didn't really have much of a plot to grasp. Still enjoying the poetic brutality in Korean films.
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burneyfan
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I'm continuing my Fantastic Voyage through the '70s...I have three different films, so I'm spoiler-tagging the paragraphs, to avoid a crazy-long post.


The Big Bird Cage -- Hill, 1972

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La salamandre a.k.a. The Salamander -- Tanner, 1971

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Bakuto gaijin butai a.k.a. Gamblers in Okinawa a.k.a. Sympathy for the Underdog -- Fukasaku, 1971

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ArthurYanthar
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Chloe in the Afternoon

Thank you for the recommendation St. Vincent. 9/10
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burneyfan
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Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania -- Mekas, 1972

My first Mekas. Mekas was born in Lithuania, but he and his brother came to the US as Displaced Persons ("DPs") after WWII. The initial part of the documentary talks about their early time in Brooklyn, and what it was like living in America in the '50s. How they came to be DPs -- the story of that journey -- is gradually unfolded during their first visit to Lithuania in 25 years (which comprises the second part -- most of the film, really).

The days Mekas spends with his family and old friends in Lithuania are wonderful to watch -- they're expressed in very fleeting, often shaky, impressionistic camerawork, rapidly cutting between moments and images, recreating the way little bits of memories often flit through one's head. The initial moments require a little acclimatization, but the viewer can get used to it pretty quickly. Much of the footage recalls an older style of life -- houses without indoor plumbing, collective farmers calculating their harvest on an abacus, the women doing much of the cooking outdoors. It's touching to see him reunite with old friends and relatives (including his elderly mother), to simultaneously remember old times and wonder what his life might have been like if WWII hadn't intervened.

A trip to Vienna and a Hamburg suburb (former location of a German prison camp) are the third and final portion of the documentary. I don't want to give too much away, but it's definitely affecting, and the end implies that modernity is rapidly encroaching on these beautiful (albeit hard), old ways of life. The past is continually eroding or destroying itself in a blaze; Mekas's documentary serves as a way to remember.
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PeacefulAnarchy
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Walk of Fame
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The Color of Money (1986) 7/10

Not sure if I'd call Cruise's performance great, but he's a perfect fit for the role and while Newman is great. It's not particularly original and uses a lot of "old generation clearing the way for the new" tropes, but it gets the job done and has a lot of great little moments. It was just the kind of film I needed right now, so that helps too.
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burneyfan
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Three long reviews and a short one (which I'll make long on Nordic thread) -- I'm spoiler-tagging the three long review paragraphs so this post isn't a mile long.


La maman et la putain a.k.a. The Mother and the Whore -- Eustache, 1973

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Turks fruit a.k.a. Turkish Delight -- Verhoeven, 1973

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The Driver -- W. Hill, 1978

Spoiler: click to toggle


Thriller -- en grym film a.k.a. Thriller -- A Cruel Picture -- Vibenius, 1974

Swedish rape-and-revenge exploitation with hardcore porn footage, pretty fun revenge training, and too many slow-motion shots. More written in the Nordic challenge thread, just as soon as I get over there and write it!
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VincentPrice
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Every time someone watches a Walter Hill movie and loves it makes me happy.
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